Home » Applying to University » Applying to University in the UK » Fabrication: The Arts & Humanities Festival at King’s College London – lots of free events open to all October 12-23

Fabrication: The Arts & Humanities Festival at King’s College London – lots of free events open to all October 12-23

FabricationThe Arts & Humanities Festival at King’s College London

 An annual event which celebrates the work going on across Faculty of Arts & Humanities at King’s College London.

Join the events taking place from 12 to 23 October 2015.

This years program for the Arts & Humanities Festival at King’s includes a range of evening lectures and talks as well as exhibitions.

For the full Program click here.

Some of the sessions you might be interested in are:

How does a shadow shine? Poetry, music & the underside of history – Tuesday 13 October 19:00

Rita Dove, Pulitzer Prize winner and former US Poet Laureate, will give the 2015 Poetry Society Annual Lecture.

Narrating order in modern clinical case reports – Tuesday 13 October 19:00

This talk will examine how case reports, spanning the period 1912 to 2009, ‘write experience into the world’ in somewhat hybrid registers which combine elements from witness statements, field notes, diaries and logs with those of memoirs and memorials, mysteries and detective fiction.

Goods from the East: fabricating Eurasia for Early Modern Europe – Friday 16 October 18:00

‘Goods from the East’ explores the role of commodities exchanged over long distances in shaping the lives and cultures of early modern Europeans.

Fabricating flesh, fabricating stories: the history, poetry & practice of waxworks – Thurs 23 October

For centuries, wax has been used to fabricate lifelike images of human bodies, whether as portraits and effigies for popular wax cabinets, as dolls for play, or as gruesomely realistic models of human anatomy and disease for medical education. This event will explore the history of the wax modelling tradition, its current practice, and the ways in which the fabrication of artificial human flesh has inspired poetry and storytelling.

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